Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Canning Dried Black Eye Peas

One of my friends and I did a canning session with dried pinto beans.  We went by the instructions in the Ball book and they turned out great.  I have already used them for taco soup.

Well she found where you can do the dried beans without having to cook them first.  I have done some kidney beans and black beans this way and they have turned out great.  Today I was working on some black eye peas.

First you get your hot jars ready and rinse off the beans.  Next, you add 2/3 cups of dry beans to each pint jar and 1/2 teaspoon of canning salt.  Make sure you just do the 2/3 cup because the beans expand a lot.  My friend didn't think it looked like enough so she added more in hers and she could hardly get the beans out when she was done!


Next, you fill the rest of the jar with boiling water. 


Make sure  you have any air bubbles out, wipe the rims of the jars with a clean rag and add your lids and put them in the pressure canner.



Leave them in the canner at a pressure of 15 pounds for 1 hour.



That's it!  So simple, I just love doing it.  Makes me want to go to the grocery store and buy a bag of every kind of dried bean they have there.  I will definitely be using these up this winter. 

Some people have asked why I would take the time to can the dried beans.  Well, if I have all the different types of beans that I use for chili dried in bags in my cabinet, I probably will not use them for the soup.  It takes awhile to prepare the dried beans and if I have these on my shelf, I will be way less tempted to just go to the grocery store and buy cans of beans to use for my recipes.  Now of course, fresh peas and beans to can is a way better option, but I don't always have those types of fresh beans available to can, especially the black and pinto beans, although I will have to look into that.

One more thing, one 32-ounce bag of dried black eye peas made 10 quart jars! I could not even fit one in the canner, so I guess I will let that one sit and use it for supper tonight :)

9 comments:

  1. That looks good. Are you canning in quart jars or pints?

    I do like having home canned ones on hand. Have a wonderful day.

    ~Cheryl

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    1. Cheryl, I used pint jars here. I noticed I said quart! I went back and changed it, thank you :)

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  2. Hello, I need some advice. I just finished canning some dried black eyed peas. I did everything correct. I soaked the beans over night, I cooked the beans 30 minutes, I packed my beans, I wiped the rims, I heated my seals, etc, etc, etc.
    whenever I took my jars (pints) out the water was still boiling. The wonderful popping sound started. I was happy ...now a few hours later I checked the jars and ALL the water is GONE....All Jars where in tact, no signs of liquid in the pressure canner. NOW WHAT????? Are the going to be OK??? I can't add liquid to the jars.... What will happen to them over time??? How long with the last???
    Thanks for your help...I am not having a great track record with canning this year. Its my first year and it may be my last....

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    1. I'm assuming that since the water was still boiling, you didn't let the canner release all the pressure before you opened the lid. The canner needs to de-pressurize naturally before you open the lid....don't do a quick release. (I've done this same thing with squash) Let the canner depressurize on it's own before opening)

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  3. Would you be willing to share your taco soup recipe? Sounds good.

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  4. Have you canned any of the beans with meat? I was wondering how it would turn out if I put half a slice of bacon in each pint of blackeyed peas. Tasty or yucky.

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  5. um what is the point of canning dried beans? isn't canning just a way to preserve them? dried beans are already preserved.

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    1. Personally, I can them because it makes dinner time so much quicker and easier.

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  6. I like canning beans, so have them on hand ready to go if utilities go out or storm, whatever. They also have water in them, in case water plants are effected. We had this happen in Des Moines before because of flooding

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